Helping a Loved One Cope With a Loss of Independance

What are some ways in helping a loved one cope with a loss of independence? Incorrporate these strategies for fostering cooperation and open communication. 

How do you help an aging loved one who doesn't want help? Helping a loved one cope with a loss of independence means understanding strategies for fostering cooperation and communication.  

If your loved one is experiencing a loss of independance, he or she may feel frightened, vulnerable, or angry. If you suspect that your loved one is feeling this way, you may be hesitant to bring up the topic of elder care.

To start communicating with your loved one about his or her need for care, follow these tips:

  • Enlist the help of family members when talking to your loved one. Family and friends may be able to help a loved one cope with a loss of independence.
  • If an aging senior doesn't want to discuss the topic of care the first time it is brought up, it may be wise to try again later. Choose a time and place when you both are relaxed.
  • If you are having a hard time talking with your loved one, it may be wise to enlist the help of a professional. Older people are often willing to listen to the advice of their doctor in regards to their best options for care.

Helping a loved one cope with the loss of independence may not be easy. A loss of independence can create frustration, feelings of uselessness, and sadness. While nothing can fully minimize the fear and anguish that comes with a loss of independence, there are things that you can do to help older adults address these issues.